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About Deviant Artist TraceyFemale/United States Recent Activity
Deviant for 10 Years
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Matt Smith Portrait Coloring Book Style by euphoriafish Matt Smith Portrait Coloring Book Style :iconeuphoriafish:euphoriafish 2 0 MrFish-1 by euphoriafish MrFish-1 :iconeuphoriafish:euphoriafish 0 0 LetterheadTemplate by euphoriafish LetterheadTemplate :iconeuphoriafish:euphoriafish 0 0 Forum Birthday card for Frank Conniff by euphoriafish Forum Birthday card for Frank Conniff :iconeuphoriafish:euphoriafish 0 0 InDesign Exercise: Parody Newspaper Layout by euphoriafish InDesign Exercise: Parody Newspaper Layout :iconeuphoriafish:euphoriafish 0 0 Holgabutsu by euphoriafish Holgabutsu :iconeuphoriafish:euphoriafish 0 0 Favstar Idol by euphoriafish Favstar Idol :iconeuphoriafish:euphoriafish 0 0 EFISH by euphoriafish EFISH :iconeuphoriafish:euphoriafish 0 0 Queen Bee Regina by euphoriafish Queen Bee Regina :iconeuphoriafish:euphoriafish 2 0 Seahorse by euphoriafish Seahorse :iconeuphoriafish:euphoriafish 0 0 Box of Rain by euphoriafish Box of Rain :iconeuphoriafish:euphoriafish 0 3 Truckin Like the Doodah Man by euphoriafish Truckin Like the Doodah Man :iconeuphoriafish:euphoriafish 0 0 Cinematic Titanic favicon by euphoriafish Cinematic Titanic favicon :iconeuphoriafish:euphoriafish 0 0 First DA ID tag by euphoriafish First DA ID tag :iconeuphoriafish:euphoriafish 0 1 Titans in Silly Clothes: MJP by euphoriafish Titans in Silly Clothes: MJP :iconeuphoriafish:euphoriafish 2 0 ACEO- Broccoli Ocarina by euphoriafish ACEO- Broccoli Ocarina :iconeuphoriafish:euphoriafish 1 8

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My 1st Handmade TARDIS by SpeakNSpirit My 1st Handmade TARDIS :iconspeaknspirit:SpeakNSpirit 4 0 Nausicaa by GUWEIZ Nausicaa :iconguweiz:GUWEIZ 2,426 68 Nausicaa by LCibos Nausicaa :iconlcibos:LCibos 2,250 213 BB-8 Gift Sculpt by PurpleOctopus BB-8 Gift Sculpt :iconpurpleoctopus:PurpleOctopus 3 3 Desolation by MinnaSundberg Desolation :iconminnasundberg:MinnaSundberg 1,458 34 Smash It Up by Vic-Perfecto Smash It Up :iconvic-perfecto:Vic-Perfecto 1 1 Watercolor Studies by Vic-Perfecto Watercolor Studies :iconvic-perfecto:Vic-Perfecto 1 0 Golden Age Tutorial by rosalarian Golden Age Tutorial :iconrosalarian:rosalarian 2,010 150 At 103 Call of the Mild by Tavicat At 103 Call of the Mild :icontavicat:Tavicat 40 8 Koi Fish Kiss by jsparrow4
Mature content
Koi Fish Kiss :iconjsparrow4:jsparrow4 2 3
Arisu and White Rabbit by Tavicat Arisu and White Rabbit :icontavicat:Tavicat 15 6 Jashin's Brushes Set 12 by J-A-S-H-I-N Jashin's Brushes Set 12 :iconj-a-s-h-i-n:J-A-S-H-I-N 534 83 Flash: Itsudemo Game and Watch by tragedyann Flash: Itsudemo Game and Watch :icontragedyann:tragedyann 45 28 The MST3K Animated Wallpaper by AndrewDickman The MST3K Animated Wallpaper :iconandrewdickman:AndrewDickman 1,574 284 Tanake Trang by janaschi Tanake Trang :iconjanaschi:janaschi 2,381 150 Blue commission by janaschi
Mature content
Blue commission :iconjanaschi:janaschi 12,593 916

Activity


On Fan Art (Personal Rules and Reframing the Shame of Making Fan Art at All)


Japanese language uses the phrase “Tsumaranaimono desu ga…” — “It’s a boring, small, meaningless gesture, but…” [I hope you can find it in your hardest of hearts to like worthless little old nuisance me in all my obnoxiousness anyway?]  I wish the people I draw fan art for spoke Japanese, because then they would instantly understand exactly how I feel if I actually give someone a picture I drew of them.


The only thing worse than fan art is wondering if you should or shouldn’t take the time to draw fan art.  For one, it's free craft practice that still takes a time commitment and am I good enough for commissions yet or is it suitable for free marketing of my skills?  I don't want commissions asking my to draw someone else's IP for money, though I would love to be one of the artists paid to work on that Doctor Who coloring book.  How do you get paid permission to draw Disney characters or known name actors?  Celebrities have propaganda machines publishing their faces over and over and over.  Should I take the time to add another copy of this face to the diaspora of celebrity face worship?  What if the subject actually sees it— is it upsetting if it’s a mediocre effort?  If there is a concept to the image, what do my conceptual or medium choices say about me as a person and my sanity levels? 


Clearly, I have lost my mind, which said that this concept made perfect sense because Matt Smith has the raisins.  That is to say, he has a good head on his shoulders as I think when I am telling someone in French they are correct and translating it both literally and homophonetically in my head.  There are no references to California Raisins in the show that I am aware of, though I am definitely way behind on watching Doctor Who, leaving off with the "Snowmen" story disgusted that Pondlife was over.  Give or take watching "The Day of the Doctor" which was fun.  Will finish the series some day when convenient or when I can buy DVDs or digital files.  I’m not even his number one fan so why would I expose myself to the harsh criticism of drawing someone so easily recognizable and so uncanny valley disappointing when rendered wrong?


And yet, here it is. (See Gallery) I spent two weeks in 2015 drawing Matt Smith from two or three different reference photos plus a picture of some California Raisins figures. I vectored and colored it and I felt embarrassed and like I totally wasted my time, but a year later I guess I can show it to artist friends and random internet Whovians if I am prepared to revisit what it means to me to draw fan art at all. 


Does the composition create a relationship between the subject and me or would it if I gave it to him? Almost definitely not.  I don’t think I will ever meet him.  He came to my state and I wanted to go to Wizard World but it was prohibitively expensive to my current level of budget.  Seriously scary to spend money on anything that isn’t food or an investment right now, and the amount I spend on food is too much.  Sigh.  I am under no delusions about my level of craftsmanship either— It’s about as effective as a single figure or object in my Doctor Who coloring book.  Collect a bunch of vectors and if you arrange them in a more complicated composition than this you have a whole coloring book.  


If I ever got over the embarrassment of practicing art, it’s a motivational image that says you should really trust your own instincts more.  The fast and daring moves come from hours of slower rehearsal.  You have a good head on your shoulders, so just make like a California raisin and move slowly with purpose to thoughtful action.  I never feel more relaxed than when I see those raisin faces in Will Vinton's animation, and I never feel more insecure and worried as an audience member than when I watch the 11th Doctor in seriously grave situations, to say little of his next few characters (Bully, Patrick Bateman, Skynet… the director in search of perfect lighting was inaccessible to me but with The Crown and the Robert Mapplethorpe biopic coming up, maybe he's playing happier characters again.)


I think it’s impossible to know whether someone whose face is copied already wants more copies of their face, unless you meet them and ask them.  Conceptually, if it’s rated G, PG, or PG-13 it’s probably not psychologically upsetting as long as you don’t force the subject to imagine romantic or sexual situations they didn’t sign up for.  I personally am not comfortable rehearsing situations I wouldn’t initiate in person, though that doesn’t mean I wouldn’t think about such situations.  If you suppress such feelings, it can be like bottling them.  It isn’t healthier to deny them than it is to savor them, because mere fear or avoidance doesn’t really process those feelings.  If you don’t process them and figure out how you really feel and what would be reasonable to choose to do, you are letting your subconscious mind drive and giving control over to your emotions in the moment.  Thinking about someone is rehearsing your approach to that person.  If you think about hitting them, you might find it harder to resist lashing out in person (which is why venting feelings into pillows is not redommended like mindful breathing and meditating or praying and having a dialog with God if that feels more comforting to you). If you think about having sex with them it’s important to consider how you got consent because wouldn’t it be a sad or angry object of your affection if you didn’t have consent and just kissed all over them and made them wear a Slave Leia costume against their will?  Might prove lethal to you, seeing as even Princess Leia did not enjoy and once killed a dude for making her wear the slave Leia costume.  Or, the person you’re fetishizing might have a spouse you haven’t been aware of because you are just a fan of them and that person might take issue with how much sex you are offering their life partner.  I just believe in seeing these thoughts through to outcomes and consequences and counting the hurt and angry or sad people.  Would anyone be hurt by an expression of feelings right now?  Do I have a realistic estimation of their probable reactions?  How did we meet?  Were we friends first?  Am I a taker or a giver in equal proportion?  Or is our relationship ever professorial and professional levels of personal only?  What do I have to learn from and teach to this person?


What I am saying to you is, I felt the need to crop this image to avoid showing you my hopes and dreams infused into this offering of California Raisins.  Said hopes and dreams were NOT sexual; I am just in the habit of being instantly personable and pretending I know people already, which may be annoying or invasive to people who are approached by too many people and feel guilty sometimes that they SHOULD know someone but can’t remember if they really DO know the person when faced with another person excited and happy to be with them.  The caption is intended to be a “Trust yourself” sort of message with words in three languages, which creates a barrier to understanding by delaying the reading of the sentence.  I like to have fun with how I parse foreign languages, but I realized I have no proof it’s the right sort of thing to say to or about him.  It was really more about MY self esteem needing bolstering than his, which is backed up by lots of achievement, showing up to auditions and rehearsals over and over again to develop memorable character performances that support the strong storytelling already handed to him by the show’s writer.  He carried an Olympic Torch.  The director of his next project already knows he’s got this.


I guess I wanted to believe in myself, as I've heard some acquaintances say they share an image that inspires them to boost morale on days when they are trying something challenging.  I made one.  I don't have to feel too bad about myself though, which is why I am writing this.  I have some IMDB credits and my face is in a distributed independent horror film. I'm in two other films as an extra and I took continuity notes on some films.  I published a few articles for free and got paid for a coverage reading synopsis.  My art isn't great but my writing may be going places if I keep at it. I just keep overbooking myself with free work and feeling bad about myself because I want to be writing comedy or animation but the opportunities are in drama and horror or faith friendly movies that win friends but don't make the reputation I want.  

No.  I changed my mind.  There it is.  You can be my sanity check.  Would you feel uncomfortable if someone gave you that message and they didn't know you properly?  Half the time I think I'm imagining the reason I should be embarrassed, the other half I don't think I imagined far enough.  Anyway, it's not something that needs to be said.  The man clearly believes in himself.  Do you? Do you like foreign languages in sentences to slow down your parsing or add different feelings to the expression?  Maybe it's for YOU, dear Internet.  YOU deserve this because you are awesome enough to give both a pro AND a con when you comment on someone's art, in balance without over emoting the negatives.  The positives can't be emoted enough, nor the questions be asked in enough quantity.  If you reacted, that is.  If there was no reaction, you just clicked a link and went on to the next distracting image.  Or, you went off to make your own art.


I’ve let go of the NEED for celebrities to see the art I draw of them, but it’s much harder to drop the embarrassment born in each occurrence of the practice.  As crude as this render is, it’s better than my Cinematic Titanic fan art paintings (also in this Deviant Art account), so far as craft and execution goes.  Looks like something that was bought and given to me, so it can’t be knocked for messy execution.  If I wanted a giant poster, I could enlarge it and print a gigantic poster that shows the attention I paid to the little gold flecks in the man’s eyes, and the hyperreal greener shade of green I found after studying my cat's eyes and a picture of Kermit the Frog.  Those flecks are really interesting! They were the prize for taking the time to find a good reference image to study.  He could wear one blue contact lens and have eyes like David Bowie just by standing partially in shadow like he does to make the brighter eye pop and the shadowed one dilate. Concept-wise… I didn’t really have one?  It didn’t come together as a message that reads well to anyone but me.  I had a feeling I was trying to figure out, a hope for positive experiences and better roles to come for the actor when he trusts in his instincts about his own craft, plus a lot of doubt in myself about taking time away from writing to re-dabble in my self esteem consuming college art major and try to feel good about that again.  With the Cinematic Titanic images, I had reassurance because my forum friends requested all of them.  I already had an easy audience and knew the fan art would be well received by SOMEONE if not the subjects of the pieces.


Because there was no peer audience this time, I still feel a bit like I wasted my time.  I’ve spent two weeks on one of the birthday cards I made for a celebrity before too, but that wasn’t really a waste of time because my forum friends were collaborating.  They all sent in small avatar images that showed how they felt about Joel Hodgson or Frank Conniff, and I really outdid myself on the Hodgson card adapting them to a Wizard of Oz theme.  Not really sure what he thought of it but it was enough for the other fans that we put it together on a deadline and it definitely was received by him.  So I made 50 or so people very happy by giving them an exhibition space for their appreciation of a person who made them happy with his entertainment offerings.  If I’m totally honest, I gotta credit Kate Bruton and Janelle Vreeland on those too because they started the first card when I was thinking, oh I don’t know, should we, is that a nice thing to do or should I be embarrassed for admitting I want to say thank you to entertainers in the form of a hastily executed art gift?  


So much darkness! OF COURSE you say thank you to people who have entertained you! In person if you can, and if you can’t, you band together with other people who want to say thank you and you spend time creating something together so the recipient of your appreciations knows you spent time thinking about them and you have a specific comment about what it is they do.   David Bowie exuded androgyny and an uncertain and slightly askew air of mystery.  You got a feeling that you may or may not be safe when you are with him, and I similarly wonder if I would or would not be safe with Matt Smith.  Aliens could land at any moment, zombies may have you on blast and have to be leveled with.  Everything gets too important too quickly.  And then, he takes a stint as a vicar or as Prince Phillip and it’s all hunky dory again, gravitas and pathos contained in the sudden moments where gravitas and pathos are appropriate!  Bring the man babies, he speaks baby and we all benefit from the dopamine in the huffing of their sweet sweet pheromones.


Fan art CAN be a longer thank you and shows you spent time thinking about a person, which should never be devalued because it takes a really long time to make good art and I didn’t even get there this time.  I WAS going to send this one, but it got lost in the mail and I was really glad because it is really so embarrassing I put THAT MUCH time and thought into someone I never met.  But I’m writing this up to be at peace with it.


QED: My current feelings are if there is already an audience of other fans who sort of commissioned the art, it is SORT OF worth giving it to the subject.  If you collaborated on it or you get compliments from the other fans, it is DEFINITELY worth giving it to the person and celebrating together no matter the subject reaction, and if you get surprised and impressed reactions from other artists who you think make art as well as or better than you, then it might be worth making that poster or giving your art the gallery frame treatment.


Otherwise, it’s practice.  It feels good making fan art while you’re making it because conceptualizing is an optional choice.  You might just be testing out a new medium on a popular icon shape face that happens to look like a person who arrested your attention.  You might just want to figure out how this person’s face works and not want to waste time thinking of an intimidatingly new idea to apply it to before you can even control the art supplies.  I feel pretty good about my skill level with the pen tool now, continuing to get better at cutting and slicing and rejoining paths or grouping and ungrouping objects.  Getting different line thicknesses in happens but still feels a bit limited in options, as does tapering off ends of lines to make them look more like brush strokes.  I have ideas to take this further and study other concepts and compositions with other subjects, or a few more steps still to hone the technique.  Icons teach you the structure of something you like, they separate out craft and hard thinking from the soft thinking and exploration of idea generation, and they teach you how people do or don’t look like other people.


Lessons learned from this face:

* First noticed he has a large face with large features that is rather long and rectangular.  Thought the jaw was angular and heroically chiseled, but it’s actually a bit softer than I thought.

* Looking at two different artists rendering him in the coloring book, I see the bridge of his nose is not that important.  Leaving it out brings more attention to the width of the bulb or tip, which is actually more what distinguishes his nose, as opposed to Tenth Doctor’s nose where the bridge is super important as are the eyebrows.

* You don’t want to over-define his eyebrows.  Super blocked in brows don’t look good on him, or they make it a drawing of not him but his cosplay doppelgänger who looks like him with stronger brows and dresses like Newt Scamander for optimal fandom confusion. The real winning move in rendering the real Matt Smith is where one artist in the Doctor Who coloring book used two thin lines to suggest skin folds framing his brow bone.   I also think a row of back slashes on the denser half closer to his nose is a reasonable strategy, then trail off to dotted lines that suggest skin folds.  He does actually have eyebrows sort of, they are just rather thin.  Some other artists I studied just heavily shade around his eyes, which makes them look more sunken.  Not bad for pathos moments, looks sort of strange in happy situations plus means extra shape layers in vector illustrations so it wasn’t an appealing way for me to go this time.  I decided to shade in a mid tone to suggest them.

* Vector illustration is too boring for this subject, for whom the lighting around him is always way important, often moody low lighting with bright key light in Doctor Who.  But I’m sick of those half in shadow Space Oddity stills also.  I want to see more warm tinted lighting if he’s going to be in dark backgrounds.


Going further:

* Could use a hair brush over the flat color and add lighting to the hair.

* Could add texture to clothing.

* Could color skin more three dimensionally but I didn't want to muddy it up.

* Ditto on raisin figures.  Shading, colored lines in the hair.

* Maybe a border in stamps or something.


Ha, lessons are all for me only since the printed result is lost in the mail.  The letter I actually sent hung at Chicago and did not make it overseas, which I took as a sign to reconsider the whole choice of sending it.  The case of the feels is gone.  I GOT AWAY with all that practice and development and the subject will never ever see my mediocre efforts.  SO THERE!  And full disclosure, this essay was written as a distraction from a paid logo assignment and several writing projects as we’re coming out of Christmas and I need to get back to work.  But the thought just did not go away and felt increasingly like a lose-lose situation in terms of exploring these feelings vs not exploring these feelings.  Probably no one cares that I did this little bit of self analysis.  


But as a rule only I let myself go there or even make more fan art when I 1) can’t remember the last time I went there, and 2) I think it leads to a healthier mental outlook.  I can still just say, “Hi, thanks for your acting, thanks for the autograph,” if I ever meet him in person which again is not happening that I can believe in.  Not even online since he doesn’t seem to find Twitter relaxing, or at least not publicly so. 


Fan art should never be embarrassing or a flamboyant dramatic gesture.  In its creation, you grow as an artist and learn about the subject.  Most of all, you learn about yourself and learn how to control your own emotions when you decide whether to publish it or not.:happybounce: +favHeart Waaaah! +fav No, I disagree!CURSE YOU!  I think I've fainted. Wink/Razz 

  • Listening to: "I Can't Decide" by the Scissor Sisters
  • Reading: Shakespeare
  • Watching: Cinematic Titanic, MST3K and Doctor Who
  • Playing: Ghostbusters the Video Game [PS3]
Matt Smith Portrait Coloring Book Style

Artist Journal Essay: On Fan Art (Personal Rules and Reframing the Shame of Making Fan Art at All)


Japanese language uses the phrase “Tsumaranaimono desu ga…” — “It’s a boring, small, meaningless gesture, but…” [I hope you can find it in your hardest of hearts to like worthless little old nuisance me in all my obnoxiousness anyway?]  I wish the people I draw fan art for spoke Japanese, because then they would instantly understand exactly how I feel if I actually give someone a picture I drew of them.


The only thing worse than fan art is wondering if you should or shouldn’t take the time to draw fan art.  For one, it's free craft practice that still takes a time commitment and am I good enough for commissions yet or is it suitable for free marketing of my skills?  I don't want commissions asking my to draw someone else's IP for money, though I would love to be one of the artists paid to work on that Doctor Who coloring book.  How do you get paid permission to draw Disney characters or known name actors?  Celebrities have propaganda machines publishing their faces over and over and over.  Should I take the time to add another copy of this face to the diaspora of celebrity face worship?  What if the subject actually sees it— is it upsetting if it’s a mediocre effort?  If there is a concept to the image, what do my conceptual or medium choices say about me as a person and my sanity levels? 


Clearly, I have lost my mind, which said that this concept made perfect sense because Matt Smith has the raisins.  That is to say, he has a good head on his shoulders as I think when I am telling someone in French they are correct and translating it both literally and homophonetically in my head.  There are no references to California Raisins in the show that I am aware of, though I am definitely way behind on watching Doctor Who, leaving off with the "Snowmen" story disgusted that Pondlife was over.  Give or take watching "The Day of the Doctor" which was fun.  Will finish the series some day when convenient or when I can buy DVDs or digital files.  I’m not even his number one fan so why would I expose myself to the harsh criticism of drawing someone so easily recognizable and so uncanny valley disappointing when rendered wrong?


And yet, here it is.  I spent two weeks in 2015 drawing Matt Smith from two or three different reference photos plus a picture of some California Raisins figures. I vectored and colored it and I felt embarrassed and like I totally wasted my time, but a year later I guess I can show it to artist friends and random internet Whovians if I am prepared to revisit what it means to me to draw fan art at all. 


Does the composition create a relationship between the subject and me or would it if I gave it to him? Almost definitely not.  I don’t think I will ever meet him.  He came to my state and I wanted to go to Wizard World but it was prohibitively expensive to my current level of budget.  Seriously scary to spend money on anything that isn’t food or an investment right now, and the amount I spend on food is too much.  Sigh.  I am under no delusions about my level of craftsmanship either— It’s about as effective as a single figure or object in my Doctor Who coloring book.  Collect a bunch of vectors and if you arrange them in a more complicated composition than this you have a whole coloring book.  


If I ever got over the embarrassment of practicing art, it’s a motivational image that says you should really trust your own instincts more.  The fast and daring moves come from hours of slower rehearsal.  You have a good head on your shoulders, so just make like a California raisin and move slowly with purpose to thoughtful action.  I never feel more relaxed than when I see those raisin faces in Will Vinton's animation, and I never feel more insecure and worried as an audience member than when I watch the 11th Doctor in seriously grave situations, to say little of his next few characters (Bully, Patrick Bateman, Skynet… the director in search of perfect lighting was inaccessible to me but with The Crown and the Robert Mapplethorpe biopic coming up, maybe he's playing happier characters again.)


I think it’s impossible to know whether someone whose face is copied already wants more copies of their face, unless you meet them and ask them.  Conceptually, if it’s rated G, PG, or PG-13 it’s probably not psychologically upsetting as long as you don’t force the subject to imagine romantic or sexual situations they didn’t sign up for.  I personally am not comfortable rehearsing situations I wouldn’t initiate in person, though that doesn’t mean I wouldn’t think about such situations.  If you suppress such feelings, it can be like bottling them.  It isn’t healthier to deny them than it is to savor them, because mere fear or avoidance doesn’t really process those feelings.  If you don’t process them and figure out how you really feel and what would be reasonable to choose to do, you are letting your subconscious mind drive and giving control over to your emotions in the moment.  Thinking about someone is rehearsing your approach to that person.  If you think about hitting them, you might find it harder to resist lashing out in person (which is why venting feelings into pillows is not redommended like mindful breathing and meditating or praying and having a dialog with God if that feels more comforting to you). If you think about having sex with them it’s important to consider how you got consent because wouldn’t it be a sad or angry object of your affection if you didn’t have consent and just kissed all over them and made them wear a Slave Leia costume against their will?  Might prove lethal to you, seeing as even Princess Leia did not enjoy and once killed a dude for making her wear the slave Leia costume.  Or, the person you’re fetishizing might have a spouse you haven’t been aware of because you are just a fan of them and that person might take issue with how much sex you are offering their life partner.  I just believe in seeing these thoughts through to outcomes and consequences and counting the hurt and angry or sad people.  Would anyone be hurt by an expression of feelings right now?  Do I have a realistic estimation of their probable reactions?  How did we meet?  Were we friends first?  Am I a taker or a giver in equal proportion?  Or is our relationship ever professorial and professional levels of personal only?  What do I have to learn from and teach to this person?


What I am saying to you is, I felt the need to crop this image to avoid showing you my hopes and dreams infused into this offering of California Raisins.  Said hopes and dreams were NOT sexual; I am just in the habit of being instantly personable and pretending I know people already, which may be annoying or invasive to people who are approached by too many people and feel guilty sometimes that they SHOULD know someone but can’t remember if they really DO know the person when faced with another person excited and happy to be with them.  The caption is intended to be a “Trust yourself” sort of message with words in three languages, which creates a barrier to understanding by delaying the reading of the sentence.  I like to have fun with how I parse foreign languages, but I realized I have no proof it’s the right sort of thing to say to or about him.  It was really more about MY self esteem needing bolstering than his, which is backed up by lots of achievement, showing up to auditions and rehearsals over and over again to develop memorable character performances that support the strong storytelling already handed to him by the show’s writer.  He carried an Olympic Torch.  The director of his next project already knows he’s got this.


I guess I wanted to believe in myself, as I've heard some acquaintances say they share an image that inspires them to boost morale on days when they are trying something challenging.  I made one.  I don't have to feel too bad about myself though, which is why I am writing this.  I have some IMDB credits and my face is in a distributed independent horror film. I'm in two other films as an extra and I took continuity notes on some films.  I published a few articles for free and got paid for a coverage reading synopsis.  My art isn't great but my writing may be going places if I keep at it. I just keep overbooking myself with free work and feeling bad about myself because I want to be writing comedy or animation but the opportunities are in drama and horror or faith friendly movies that win friends but don't make the reputation I want.  

No.  I changed my mind.  There it is.  You can be my sanity check.  Would you feel uncomfortable if someone gave you that message and they didn't know you properly?  Half the time I think I'm imagining the reason I should be embarrassed, the other half I don't think I imagined far enough.  Anyway, it's not something that needs to be said.  The man clearly believes in himself.  Do you? Do you like foreign languages in sentences to slow down your parsing or add different feelings to the expression?  Maybe it's for YOU, dear Internet.  YOU deserve this because you are awesome enough to give both a pro AND a con when you comment on someone's art, in balance without over emoting the negatives.  The positives can't be emoted enough, nor the questions be asked in enough quantity.  If you reacted, that is.  If there was no reaction, you just clicked a link and went on to the next distracting image.  Or, you went off to make your own art.


I’ve let go of the NEED for celebrities to see the art I draw of them, but it’s much harder to drop the embarrassment born in each occurrence of the practice.  As crude as this render is, it’s better than my Cinematic Titanic fan art paintings (also in this Deviant Art account), so far as craft and execution goes.  Looks like something that was bought and given to me, so it can’t be knocked for messy execution.  If I wanted a giant poster, I could enlarge it and print a gigantic poster that shows the attention I paid to the little gold flecks in the man’s eyes, and the hyperreal greener shade of green I found after studying my cat's eyes and a picture of Kermit the Frog.  Those flecks are really interesting! They were the prize for taking the time to find a good reference image to study.  He could wear one blue contact lens and have eyes like David Bowie just by standing partially in shadow like he does to make the brighter eye pop and the shadowed one dilate. Concept-wise… I didn’t really have one?  It didn’t come together as a message that reads well to anyone but me.  I had a feeling I was trying to figure out, a hope for positive experiences and better roles to come for the actor when he trusts in his instincts about his own craft, plus a lot of doubt in myself about taking time away from writing to re-dabble in my self esteem consuming college art major and try to feel good about that again.  With the Cinematic Titanic images, I had reassurance because my forum friends requested all of them.  I already had an easy audience and knew the fan art would be well received by SOMEONE if not the subjects of the pieces.


Because there was no peer audience this time, I still feel a bit like I wasted my time.  I’ve spent two weeks on one of the birthday cards I made for a celebrity before too, but that wasn’t really a waste of time because my forum friends were collaborating.  They all sent in small avatar images that showed how they felt about Joel Hodgson or Frank Conniff, and I really outdid myself on the Hodgson card adapting them to a Wizard of Oz theme.  Not really sure what he thought of it but it was enough for the other fans that we put it together on a deadline and it definitely was received by him.  So I made 50 or so people very happy by giving them an exhibition space for their appreciation of a person who made them happy with his entertainment offerings.  If I’m totally honest, I gotta credit Kate Bruton and Janelle Vreeland on those too because they started the first card when I was thinking, oh I don’t know, should we, is that a nice thing to do or should I be embarrassed for admitting I want to say thank you to entertainers in the form of a hastily executed art gift?  


So much darkness! OF COURSE you say thank you to people who have entertained you! In person if you can, and if you can’t, you band together with other people who want to say thank you and you spend time creating something together so the recipient of your appreciations knows you spent time thinking about them and you have a specific comment about what it is they do.   David Bowie exuded androgyny and an uncertain and slightly askew air of mystery.  You got a feeling that you may or may not be safe when you are with him, and I similarly wonder if I would or would not be safe with Matt Smith.  Aliens could land at any moment, zombies may have you on blast and have to be leveled with.  Everything gets too important too quickly.  And then, he takes a stint as a vicar or as Prince Phillip and it’s all hunky dory again, gravitas and pathos contained in the sudden moments where gravitas and pathos are appropriate!  Bring the man babies, he speaks baby and we all benefit from the dopamine in the huffing of their sweet sweet pheromones.


Fan art CAN be a longer thank you and shows you spent time thinking about a person, which should never be devalued because it takes a really long time to make good art and I didn’t even get there this time.  I WAS going to send this one, but it got lost in the mail and I was really glad because it is really so embarrassing I put THAT MUCH time and thought into someone I never met.  But I’m writing this up to be at peace with it.


QED: My current feelings are if there is already an audience of other fans who sort of commissioned the art, it is SORT OF worth giving it to the subject.  If you collaborated on it or you get compliments from the other fans, it is DEFINITELY worth giving it to the person and celebrating together no matter the subject reaction, and if you get surprised and impressed reactions from other artists who you think make art as well as or better than you, then it might be worth making that poster or giving your art the gallery frame treatment.


Otherwise, it’s practice.  It feels good making fan art while you’re making it because conceptualizing is an optional choice.  You might just be testing out a new medium on a popular icon shape face that happens to look like a person who arrested your attention.  You might just want to figure out how this person’s face works and not want to waste time thinking of an intimidatingly new idea to apply it to before you can even control the art supplies.  I feel pretty good about my skill level with the pen tool now, continuing to get better at cutting and slicing and rejoining paths or grouping and ungrouping objects.  Getting different line thicknesses in happens but still feels a bit limited in options, as does tapering off ends of lines to make them look more like brush strokes.  I have ideas to take this further and study other concepts and compositions with other subjects, or a few more steps still to hone the technique.  Icons teach you the structure of something you like, they separate out craft and hard thinking from the soft thinking and exploration of idea generation, and they teach you how people do or don’t look like other people.


Lessons learned from this face:

* First noticed he has a large face with large features that is rather long and rectangular.  Thought the jaw was angular and heroically chiseled, but it’s actually a bit softer than I thought.

* Looking at two different artists rendering him in the coloring book, I see the bridge of his nose is not that important.  Leaving it out brings more attention to the width of the bulb or tip, which is actually more what distinguishes his nose, as opposed to Tenth Doctor’s nose where the bridge is super important as are the eyebrows.

* You don’t want to over-define his eyebrows.  Super blocked in brows don’t look good on him, or they make it a drawing of not him but his cosplay doppelgänger who looks like him with stronger brows and dresses like Newt Scamander for optimal fandom confusion. The real winning move in rendering the real Matt Smith is where one artist in the Doctor Who coloring book used two thin lines to suggest skin folds framing his brow bone.   I also think a row of back slashes on the denser half closer to his nose is a reasonable strategy, then trail off to dotted lines that suggest skin folds.  He does actually have eyebrows sort of, they are just rather thin.  Some other artists I studied just heavily shade around his eyes, which makes them look more sunken.  Not bad for pathos moments, looks sort of strange in happy situations plus means extra shape layers in vector illustrations so it wasn’t an appealing way for me to go this time.  I decided to shade in a mid tone to suggest them.

* Vector illustration is too boring for this subject, for whom the lighting around him is always way important, often moody low lighting with bright key light in Doctor Who.  But I’m sick of those half in shadow Space Oddity stills also.  I want to see more warm tinted lighting if he’s going to be in dark backgrounds.


Going further:

* Could use a hair brush over the flat color and add lighting to the hair.

* Could add texture to clothing.

* Could color skin more three dimensionally but I didn't want to muddy it up.

* Ditto on raisin figures.  Shading, colored lines in the hair.

* Maybe a border in stamps or something.


Ha, lessons are all for me only since the printed result is lost in the mail.  The letter I actually sent hung at Chicago and did not make it overseas, which I took as a sign to reconsider the whole choice of sending it.  The case of the feels is gone.  I GOT AWAY with all that practice and development and the subject will never ever see my mediocre efforts.  SO THERE!  And full disclosure, this essay was written as a distraction from a paid logo assignment and several writing projects as we’re coming out of Christmas and I need to get back to work.  But the thought just did not go away and felt increasingly like a lose-lose situation in terms of exploring these feelings vs not exploring these feelings.  Probably no one cares that I did this little bit of self analysis.  


But as a rule only I let myself go there or even make more fan art when I 1) can’t remember the last time I went there, and 2) I think it leads to a healthier mental outlook.  I can still just say, “Hi, thanks for your acting, thanks for the autograph,” if I ever meet him in person which again is not happening that I can believe in.  Not even online since he doesn’t seem to find Twitter relaxing, or at least not publicly so. 


Fan art should never be embarrassing or a flamboyant dramatic gesture.  In its creation, you grow as an artist and learn about the subject.  Most of all, you learn about yourself and learn how to control your own emotions when you decide whether to publish it or not.:happybounce: +favHeart Waaaah! +fav No, I disagree!CURSE YOU!  I think I've fainted. Wink/Razz 

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deviantID

euphoriafish
Tracey
Artist
United States
I'm a comedian on Twitter:
twitter.com/euphoriafish

And I blog humor essays at euphoric-designs.com/blog

Current Residence: KY
Favourite genre of music: rock or jazz
Favourite photographer: Yasumasa Morimura, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Eikoh Hosoe
Favourite style of art: fantasy done in photorealism... like Frank Frazetta
Operating System: I'm fine operating in Windows or MacOSX
MP3 player of choice: these days it's mostly the lappy, playing iTunes, lastFM or HypeMachine
Shell of choice: bash
Wallpaper of choice: random cool pix I found on the net, especially Brandon Bird paintings
Favourite cartoon character: Dean Venture (Venture Bros.)
Personal Quote: "I'm weird, and that results in creativity!"--Joel Robinson (Hodgson), MST3K
Interests

On Fan Art (Personal Rules and Reframing the Shame of Making Fan Art at All)


Japanese language uses the phrase “Tsumaranaimono desu ga…” — “It’s a boring, small, meaningless gesture, but…” [I hope you can find it in your hardest of hearts to like worthless little old nuisance me in all my obnoxiousness anyway?]  I wish the people I draw fan art for spoke Japanese, because then they would instantly understand exactly how I feel if I actually give someone a picture I drew of them.


The only thing worse than fan art is wondering if you should or shouldn’t take the time to draw fan art.  For one, it's free craft practice that still takes a time commitment and am I good enough for commissions yet or is it suitable for free marketing of my skills?  I don't want commissions asking my to draw someone else's IP for money, though I would love to be one of the artists paid to work on that Doctor Who coloring book.  How do you get paid permission to draw Disney characters or known name actors?  Celebrities have propaganda machines publishing their faces over and over and over.  Should I take the time to add another copy of this face to the diaspora of celebrity face worship?  What if the subject actually sees it— is it upsetting if it’s a mediocre effort?  If there is a concept to the image, what do my conceptual or medium choices say about me as a person and my sanity levels? 


Clearly, I have lost my mind, which said that this concept made perfect sense because Matt Smith has the raisins.  That is to say, he has a good head on his shoulders as I think when I am telling someone in French they are correct and translating it both literally and homophonetically in my head.  There are no references to California Raisins in the show that I am aware of, though I am definitely way behind on watching Doctor Who, leaving off with the "Snowmen" story disgusted that Pondlife was over.  Give or take watching "The Day of the Doctor" which was fun.  Will finish the series some day when convenient or when I can buy DVDs or digital files.  I’m not even his number one fan so why would I expose myself to the harsh criticism of drawing someone so easily recognizable and so uncanny valley disappointing when rendered wrong?


And yet, here it is. (See Gallery) I spent two weeks in 2015 drawing Matt Smith from two or three different reference photos plus a picture of some California Raisins figures. I vectored and colored it and I felt embarrassed and like I totally wasted my time, but a year later I guess I can show it to artist friends and random internet Whovians if I am prepared to revisit what it means to me to draw fan art at all. 


Does the composition create a relationship between the subject and me or would it if I gave it to him? Almost definitely not.  I don’t think I will ever meet him.  He came to my state and I wanted to go to Wizard World but it was prohibitively expensive to my current level of budget.  Seriously scary to spend money on anything that isn’t food or an investment right now, and the amount I spend on food is too much.  Sigh.  I am under no delusions about my level of craftsmanship either— It’s about as effective as a single figure or object in my Doctor Who coloring book.  Collect a bunch of vectors and if you arrange them in a more complicated composition than this you have a whole coloring book.  


If I ever got over the embarrassment of practicing art, it’s a motivational image that says you should really trust your own instincts more.  The fast and daring moves come from hours of slower rehearsal.  You have a good head on your shoulders, so just make like a California raisin and move slowly with purpose to thoughtful action.  I never feel more relaxed than when I see those raisin faces in Will Vinton's animation, and I never feel more insecure and worried as an audience member than when I watch the 11th Doctor in seriously grave situations, to say little of his next few characters (Bully, Patrick Bateman, Skynet… the director in search of perfect lighting was inaccessible to me but with The Crown and the Robert Mapplethorpe biopic coming up, maybe he's playing happier characters again.)


I think it’s impossible to know whether someone whose face is copied already wants more copies of their face, unless you meet them and ask them.  Conceptually, if it’s rated G, PG, or PG-13 it’s probably not psychologically upsetting as long as you don’t force the subject to imagine romantic or sexual situations they didn’t sign up for.  I personally am not comfortable rehearsing situations I wouldn’t initiate in person, though that doesn’t mean I wouldn’t think about such situations.  If you suppress such feelings, it can be like bottling them.  It isn’t healthier to deny them than it is to savor them, because mere fear or avoidance doesn’t really process those feelings.  If you don’t process them and figure out how you really feel and what would be reasonable to choose to do, you are letting your subconscious mind drive and giving control over to your emotions in the moment.  Thinking about someone is rehearsing your approach to that person.  If you think about hitting them, you might find it harder to resist lashing out in person (which is why venting feelings into pillows is not redommended like mindful breathing and meditating or praying and having a dialog with God if that feels more comforting to you). If you think about having sex with them it’s important to consider how you got consent because wouldn’t it be a sad or angry object of your affection if you didn’t have consent and just kissed all over them and made them wear a Slave Leia costume against their will?  Might prove lethal to you, seeing as even Princess Leia did not enjoy and once killed a dude for making her wear the slave Leia costume.  Or, the person you’re fetishizing might have a spouse you haven’t been aware of because you are just a fan of them and that person might take issue with how much sex you are offering their life partner.  I just believe in seeing these thoughts through to outcomes and consequences and counting the hurt and angry or sad people.  Would anyone be hurt by an expression of feelings right now?  Do I have a realistic estimation of their probable reactions?  How did we meet?  Were we friends first?  Am I a taker or a giver in equal proportion?  Or is our relationship ever professorial and professional levels of personal only?  What do I have to learn from and teach to this person?


What I am saying to you is, I felt the need to crop this image to avoid showing you my hopes and dreams infused into this offering of California Raisins.  Said hopes and dreams were NOT sexual; I am just in the habit of being instantly personable and pretending I know people already, which may be annoying or invasive to people who are approached by too many people and feel guilty sometimes that they SHOULD know someone but can’t remember if they really DO know the person when faced with another person excited and happy to be with them.  The caption is intended to be a “Trust yourself” sort of message with words in three languages, which creates a barrier to understanding by delaying the reading of the sentence.  I like to have fun with how I parse foreign languages, but I realized I have no proof it’s the right sort of thing to say to or about him.  It was really more about MY self esteem needing bolstering than his, which is backed up by lots of achievement, showing up to auditions and rehearsals over and over again to develop memorable character performances that support the strong storytelling already handed to him by the show’s writer.  He carried an Olympic Torch.  The director of his next project already knows he’s got this.


I guess I wanted to believe in myself, as I've heard some acquaintances say they share an image that inspires them to boost morale on days when they are trying something challenging.  I made one.  I don't have to feel too bad about myself though, which is why I am writing this.  I have some IMDB credits and my face is in a distributed independent horror film. I'm in two other films as an extra and I took continuity notes on some films.  I published a few articles for free and got paid for a coverage reading synopsis.  My art isn't great but my writing may be going places if I keep at it. I just keep overbooking myself with free work and feeling bad about myself because I want to be writing comedy or animation but the opportunities are in drama and horror or faith friendly movies that win friends but don't make the reputation I want.  

No.  I changed my mind.  There it is.  You can be my sanity check.  Would you feel uncomfortable if someone gave you that message and they didn't know you properly?  Half the time I think I'm imagining the reason I should be embarrassed, the other half I don't think I imagined far enough.  Anyway, it's not something that needs to be said.  The man clearly believes in himself.  Do you? Do you like foreign languages in sentences to slow down your parsing or add different feelings to the expression?  Maybe it's for YOU, dear Internet.  YOU deserve this because you are awesome enough to give both a pro AND a con when you comment on someone's art, in balance without over emoting the negatives.  The positives can't be emoted enough, nor the questions be asked in enough quantity.  If you reacted, that is.  If there was no reaction, you just clicked a link and went on to the next distracting image.  Or, you went off to make your own art.


I’ve let go of the NEED for celebrities to see the art I draw of them, but it’s much harder to drop the embarrassment born in each occurrence of the practice.  As crude as this render is, it’s better than my Cinematic Titanic fan art paintings (also in this Deviant Art account), so far as craft and execution goes.  Looks like something that was bought and given to me, so it can’t be knocked for messy execution.  If I wanted a giant poster, I could enlarge it and print a gigantic poster that shows the attention I paid to the little gold flecks in the man’s eyes, and the hyperreal greener shade of green I found after studying my cat's eyes and a picture of Kermit the Frog.  Those flecks are really interesting! They were the prize for taking the time to find a good reference image to study.  He could wear one blue contact lens and have eyes like David Bowie just by standing partially in shadow like he does to make the brighter eye pop and the shadowed one dilate. Concept-wise… I didn’t really have one?  It didn’t come together as a message that reads well to anyone but me.  I had a feeling I was trying to figure out, a hope for positive experiences and better roles to come for the actor when he trusts in his instincts about his own craft, plus a lot of doubt in myself about taking time away from writing to re-dabble in my self esteem consuming college art major and try to feel good about that again.  With the Cinematic Titanic images, I had reassurance because my forum friends requested all of them.  I already had an easy audience and knew the fan art would be well received by SOMEONE if not the subjects of the pieces.


Because there was no peer audience this time, I still feel a bit like I wasted my time.  I’ve spent two weeks on one of the birthday cards I made for a celebrity before too, but that wasn’t really a waste of time because my forum friends were collaborating.  They all sent in small avatar images that showed how they felt about Joel Hodgson or Frank Conniff, and I really outdid myself on the Hodgson card adapting them to a Wizard of Oz theme.  Not really sure what he thought of it but it was enough for the other fans that we put it together on a deadline and it definitely was received by him.  So I made 50 or so people very happy by giving them an exhibition space for their appreciation of a person who made them happy with his entertainment offerings.  If I’m totally honest, I gotta credit Kate Bruton and Janelle Vreeland on those too because they started the first card when I was thinking, oh I don’t know, should we, is that a nice thing to do or should I be embarrassed for admitting I want to say thank you to entertainers in the form of a hastily executed art gift?  


So much darkness! OF COURSE you say thank you to people who have entertained you! In person if you can, and if you can’t, you band together with other people who want to say thank you and you spend time creating something together so the recipient of your appreciations knows you spent time thinking about them and you have a specific comment about what it is they do.   David Bowie exuded androgyny and an uncertain and slightly askew air of mystery.  You got a feeling that you may or may not be safe when you are with him, and I similarly wonder if I would or would not be safe with Matt Smith.  Aliens could land at any moment, zombies may have you on blast and have to be leveled with.  Everything gets too important too quickly.  And then, he takes a stint as a vicar or as Prince Phillip and it’s all hunky dory again, gravitas and pathos contained in the sudden moments where gravitas and pathos are appropriate!  Bring the man babies, he speaks baby and we all benefit from the dopamine in the huffing of their sweet sweet pheromones.


Fan art CAN be a longer thank you and shows you spent time thinking about a person, which should never be devalued because it takes a really long time to make good art and I didn’t even get there this time.  I WAS going to send this one, but it got lost in the mail and I was really glad because it is really so embarrassing I put THAT MUCH time and thought into someone I never met.  But I’m writing this up to be at peace with it.


QED: My current feelings are if there is already an audience of other fans who sort of commissioned the art, it is SORT OF worth giving it to the subject.  If you collaborated on it or you get compliments from the other fans, it is DEFINITELY worth giving it to the person and celebrating together no matter the subject reaction, and if you get surprised and impressed reactions from other artists who you think make art as well as or better than you, then it might be worth making that poster or giving your art the gallery frame treatment.


Otherwise, it’s practice.  It feels good making fan art while you’re making it because conceptualizing is an optional choice.  You might just be testing out a new medium on a popular icon shape face that happens to look like a person who arrested your attention.  You might just want to figure out how this person’s face works and not want to waste time thinking of an intimidatingly new idea to apply it to before you can even control the art supplies.  I feel pretty good about my skill level with the pen tool now, continuing to get better at cutting and slicing and rejoining paths or grouping and ungrouping objects.  Getting different line thicknesses in happens but still feels a bit limited in options, as does tapering off ends of lines to make them look more like brush strokes.  I have ideas to take this further and study other concepts and compositions with other subjects, or a few more steps still to hone the technique.  Icons teach you the structure of something you like, they separate out craft and hard thinking from the soft thinking and exploration of idea generation, and they teach you how people do or don’t look like other people.


Lessons learned from this face:

* First noticed he has a large face with large features that is rather long and rectangular.  Thought the jaw was angular and heroically chiseled, but it’s actually a bit softer than I thought.

* Looking at two different artists rendering him in the coloring book, I see the bridge of his nose is not that important.  Leaving it out brings more attention to the width of the bulb or tip, which is actually more what distinguishes his nose, as opposed to Tenth Doctor’s nose where the bridge is super important as are the eyebrows.

* You don’t want to over-define his eyebrows.  Super blocked in brows don’t look good on him, or they make it a drawing of not him but his cosplay doppelgänger who looks like him with stronger brows and dresses like Newt Scamander for optimal fandom confusion. The real winning move in rendering the real Matt Smith is where one artist in the Doctor Who coloring book used two thin lines to suggest skin folds framing his brow bone.   I also think a row of back slashes on the denser half closer to his nose is a reasonable strategy, then trail off to dotted lines that suggest skin folds.  He does actually have eyebrows sort of, they are just rather thin.  Some other artists I studied just heavily shade around his eyes, which makes them look more sunken.  Not bad for pathos moments, looks sort of strange in happy situations plus means extra shape layers in vector illustrations so it wasn’t an appealing way for me to go this time.  I decided to shade in a mid tone to suggest them.

* Vector illustration is too boring for this subject, for whom the lighting around him is always way important, often moody low lighting with bright key light in Doctor Who.  But I’m sick of those half in shadow Space Oddity stills also.  I want to see more warm tinted lighting if he’s going to be in dark backgrounds.


Going further:

* Could use a hair brush over the flat color and add lighting to the hair.

* Could add texture to clothing.

* Could color skin more three dimensionally but I didn't want to muddy it up.

* Ditto on raisin figures.  Shading, colored lines in the hair.

* Maybe a border in stamps or something.


Ha, lessons are all for me only since the printed result is lost in the mail.  The letter I actually sent hung at Chicago and did not make it overseas, which I took as a sign to reconsider the whole choice of sending it.  The case of the feels is gone.  I GOT AWAY with all that practice and development and the subject will never ever see my mediocre efforts.  SO THERE!  And full disclosure, this essay was written as a distraction from a paid logo assignment and several writing projects as we’re coming out of Christmas and I need to get back to work.  But the thought just did not go away and felt increasingly like a lose-lose situation in terms of exploring these feelings vs not exploring these feelings.  Probably no one cares that I did this little bit of self analysis.  


But as a rule only I let myself go there or even make more fan art when I 1) can’t remember the last time I went there, and 2) I think it leads to a healthier mental outlook.  I can still just say, “Hi, thanks for your acting, thanks for the autograph,” if I ever meet him in person which again is not happening that I can believe in.  Not even online since he doesn’t seem to find Twitter relaxing, or at least not publicly so. 


Fan art should never be embarrassing or a flamboyant dramatic gesture.  In its creation, you grow as an artist and learn about the subject.  Most of all, you learn about yourself and learn how to control your own emotions when you decide whether to publish it or not.:happybounce: +favHeart Waaaah! +fav No, I disagree!CURSE YOU!  I think I've fainted. Wink/Razz 

  • Listening to: "I Can't Decide" by the Scissor Sisters
  • Reading: Shakespeare
  • Watching: Cinematic Titanic, MST3K and Doctor Who
  • Playing: Ghostbusters the Video Game [PS3]

Comments


Add a Comment:
 
:icontragedyann:
tragedyann Featured By Owner Jun 20, 2008  Student
Euph--you're that one poster on the CT forum! :XD: Did your download finish or did you mail-order?
Reply
:iconrevesburger:
revesburger Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2008
many many thanks for the watch :dance:
Reply
:iconrevesburger:
revesburger Featured By Owner Jun 4, 2008
:wave:
Reply
:iconpurpleoctopus:
PurpleOctopus Featured By Owner Mar 3, 2008
There's a tag going around, see my journal. >.> You're it.
Reply
:iconmystarkey:
MyStarkey Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2008
Thanks for the doing the Friend-ly thing. Good hanging out with you and all the CAs at the GDC!
Reply
:iconmippa:
mippa Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2008
Thank you for the add! :heart:
Reply
:iconwerner-diedericks:
Werner-Diedericks Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2007  Professional Digital Artist
Hey! thanks for adding me to ur friends list!
Reply
:iconhiuki:
Hiuki Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2007
Thankyou for the watch :hug:
Reply
:iconmagnoliaqueen:
magnoliaqueen Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2007  Professional Artist
Thanks for the watch! :D
Reply
:icondrstein:
DrStein Featured By Owner Sep 9, 2007  Professional Digital Artist
thanks for the watch!
Reply
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